Applied Radiology
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Applied Radiology is pleased to offer you a selection of free SA-CME accredited courses to choose from, as part of your free subscription to AR.
SA-CME
Accreditation/Designation Statement
The Institute for Advanced Medical Education (IAME) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The Institute for Advanced Medical Education (IAME) designates these Journal-based activities for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ each. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
These credits qualify as SA-CME credits.
A Multimodality Review Of Solid and Cystic Pancreatic Masses
Samir Mehta, MD, and Jonathan Dorff, MD
Estimated time for completion: 1 hour   •   Date of release and review: August 1, 2018   •   Expiration Date: July 31, 2020
The discovery of incidental asymptomatic pancreatic masses has gone up dramatically with the advent and increasing accessibility of CT and MRI.
It is imperative to understand the different imaging features and behaviors of these masses on CT and MRI to construct an appropriate differential diagnosis, as recommendations based on these masses are very different. Knowledge of the relevant clinical history and patient populations affected is also important to formulate an accurate diagnosis. It is also important to recognized pitfalls in diagnosing the masses, as there are both typical and atypical appearances.
There are also mimics of pancreatic masses that lead to unnecessary follow-up and workup, for which the radiologist should be aware. A multimodality approach is frequently needed to narrow the differential diagnosis, though tissue sampling is usually required for a definitive diagnosis.
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Pediatric Bone Imaging: Differentiating Benign Lesions From Malignant
Alysha Vartevan, DO; Crystal May, DO; and Craig E. Barnes, MD
Estimated time for completion: 1 hour   •   Date of release and review: July 1, 2018   •   Expiration Date: June 30, 2020
Bone tumors are one of the most common lesions encoun-tered by radiologists. Fortunately, most pediatric bone tumors are benign. Although cross-sectional imaging such as CT or MRI can be useful, the most important imaging modality in the initial workup of a bone tumor is the plain radiograph.
Differentiating between benign and malignant bone tu-mors is not always straightforward; however, it is possible to distinguish between them by carefully evaluating charac-teristics such as the lesion’s type of margin, pattern of bone destruction, type of periosteal reaction and presence of an as-sociated soft tissue mass. In addition, matrix type and tumor location can help narrow the differential diagnosis.
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PE or no PE? Alternative diagnoses on CTA
Kelly W. Capel, MD, and Lynn S. Broderick, MD, FACR
Estimated time for completion: 1 hour   •   Date of release and review: March 1, 2018   •   Expiration Date: February 28, 2020
Given that pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third-leading cause of cardiovascular death and that the signs and symptoms of PE are often nonspecific, many care providers obtain CTA in the acute-care setting to evaluate for any life-threatening or urgent pathology.
While most of these patients will likely not have an underlying PE, this article showcases several alternative potential pathologies, ranging from common intrathoracic conditions such as pneumonia, to acute aortic syndrome and intra-abdominal pathology, which may be partially captured via subtle clues on CTA examinations.
In the acute-care setting, the radiologist’s ability to recognize other potential sources of pain and shortness of breath as well as coexisting pathology in patients being evaluated for PE with CTA is critical.
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Applied hepatobiliary scintigraphy in chronic gallbladder diseases
Mark Tulchinsky, MD, FACNM
Estimated time for completion: 1 hour   •   Date of release and review: September 1, 2016   •   Expiration Date: August 31, 2018
Educational gaps are responsible for a significant variability in methodological practice in the use of CCK-CS with calculation of GBEF in patients with suspected gallbladder diseases.  In addition, emerging evidence continues to refine the methodology of CCK-CS.  Clinicians must remain abreast of current recommendations and innovative practices in order to provide the most specific CCK-CS test results in patients with suspected FGBD.
This article will address the role of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) in the diagnosis and management of this often challenging clinical conundrum.
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